New Cochrane Review: Optical correction of refractive error for preventing and treating eye symptoms in computer users

New Review from Cochrane Work; Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE Optical correction of refractive error for preventing and treating eye symptoms in computer users has published. 

What is the aim of this review? 

Computer users frequently complain about problems with their eyes, or headaches. Eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery of the eye might help to decrease or prevent these symptoms. We examined the effects of these interventions on eye symptoms and quality of life.

Key messages

Computer glasses with specific types of lenses are no different to other types of computer glasses in terms of eye symptoms. Computer glasses might improve eye symptoms more than glasses designed for daily use in the short term but not at six months follow-up and there is no evidence on long-term follow-up. Due to the very low quality of the evidence we are uncertain about this conclusion. There are no studies on contact lenses or eye surgery to decrease eye symptoms of computer users. Randomised studies are needed with hundreds of participants that better measure symptoms at one-year follow-up.

Authors' conclusions

There is low to very low quality evidence that providing computer users with progressive computer glasses does not lead to a considerable decrease in problems with the eyes or headaches compared to other computer glasses. Progressive computer glasses might be slightly better than progressive glasses for daily use in the short term but not in the intermediate term and there is no data on long-term follow-up. The quality of the evidence is low or very low and therefore we are uncertain about this conclusion. Larger studies with several hundreds of participants are needed with proper randomisation, validated outcome measurement methods, and longer follow-up of at least one year to improve the quality of the evidence.